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Climate Change

Click to visit OceanClimate.org

 

 

Waves of Change is working with groups like the Climate Change Institute to address a number of climate change issues related to the oceans including:

 -Ocean acidification.

 -Bleaching of coral reefs.

 -Change in ocean currents.

 -Impacts on marine food security.

 -Sea level rise.

 -Relationships of oceans to climate change

Working with its newly formed coalition partnerships and utilizing its new communication technologies Wave’s of Change campaign works to keep the public informed and empowered to be advocates for responsible policy related to oceans and climate change.

Waves of Change campaign assists the public particularly in coastal areas to understand the impacts of climate change.               

Independent of the details such as the exact rate of warming, the specific nature of the impacts, or how much humans are to blame, the impacts of global warming can no longer be ignored.

View "Climate Change Scientists Warn of Ocean Damage" video below.

 

For more news, information, videos and resources for Climate Change,

Click Here

 

 

Recently Updated
Ocean acidifying 10 times faster than anytime in the last 55 million years, putting polar ecosystems at risk Last Updated on 2014-03-11 09:01:11 An assessment of ocean acidification, presented at the UN Climate Change Conference in Warsaw in November 2013, starkly concluded that acidity is on track to rise 170 percent by the end of this century. As many key species are sensitive to changes in acidity, this would drastically impact ocean ecosystems, with effects especially pronounced in polar regions where the cold waters intensify acidification, and which are home to many organisms that are particularly vulnerable to acidification. The ocean acts as a giant sink for carbon, absorbing 24 million tons of CO2 from the atmosphere every day. Since industrialization, approximately 30 percent of anthropogenic (human generated) CO2 has been absorbed in this way. In the context of climate change this is incredibly important, as the amount of atmospheric CO2 is directly linked to global temperatures. But as CO2 is absorbed, the pH of the... More »
Conservation biologist: Environmental consequences of Keystone ‘epic’ Last Updated on 2014-02-05 15:45:59                   Conservation biologist Dr. Reese Halter is asked by MSNBC host Craig Melvin to respond to House Speaker John Boehner's call to build the Keystone XL pipleline. Dr. Halter shares what he thinks would be the environmental dangers the Keystone XL pipeline.  Dr. Halter also responds to the water crisis caused by the West Virginia chemical spill.     More »
Multiple ocean stresses threaten "globally significant" marine extinction Last Updated on 2014-01-04 14:54:36     A high-level international workshop convened by IPSO met at the University of Oxford earlier this year. It was the first inter-disciplinary international meeting of marine scientists of its kind and was designed to consider the cumulative impact of multiple stressors on the ocean, including warming, acidification, and overfishing. The 3 day workshop, co-sponsored by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), looked at the latest science across different disciplines. The 27 participants from 18 organisations in 6 countries produced a grave assessment of current threats — and a stark conclusion about future risks to marine and human life if the current trajectory of damage continues: that the world's ocean is at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history. Delegates called for urgent and... More »
Rising ocean acidification leads to anxiety in fish Last Updated on 2014-01-01 19:09:30 by Mario Aguilera A new research study combining marine physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and behavioral psychology has revealed a surprising outcome from increases of carbon dioxide uptake in the oceans: anxious fish. A growing base of scientific evidence has shown that the absorption of human-produced carbon dioxide into the world's oceans is causing surface waters to decline in pH, causing a rise in acidity. This ocean acidification is known to disrupt the growth of shells and skeletons of certain marine animals but other consequences such as behavioral impacts have been largely unknown. In a study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and MacEwan University in Edmonton, Canada, have shown for the first time that rising acidity levels increase anxiety in... More »
cean poverty: warming seas will affect poorest first Last Updated on 2013-12-31 13:18:08 By Tim Radford Almost a billion people rely on the oceans for food and jobs. What will happen to them when fish and shellfish decline as the waters get warmer and more acidic?                       LONDON—GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS FROM industry and power generation have begun to trigger ocean changes that will impose huge costs to the poorest people on the planet. Only in the polar regions would there be any increase in productivity or in oxygen levels. Nowhere would there be any cooling. These changes are likely to cascade through marine ecosystems and habitats to the deep ocean itself and to affect humans along the way, according to a report published recently in the journal Public Library of Science Biology. “The consequence of these co-occurring changes are massive: everything from species survival to... More »