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Focus Areas

The Waves of Change program focuses on six areas that most effect the world's oceans today.

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Tracking Fishy Behavior, From Space Last Updated on 2014-11-16 20:10:18                     Fishing boats in the Phoenix Islands (Christopher Pala) by Christoper Pala A new program aims to allow anybody to watch for poachers using satellite imagery and ship positioning systems. But whether it will actually send illegal fishing crews to court is an open question.Since the first hook caught the first fish perhaps 40,000 years ago, technology has raced with increasing speed to extract more and more fish from the oceans. Most big fish are long gone and fishing vessels are inexorably hauling in the rest—sometimes legally, sometimes not. But on Friday, American non-profits SkyTruth and Oceana, supported by Google, unveiled a prototype program called Global Fishing Watch that will eventually allow anyone with a computer to observe which vessel is fishing where—and perhaps infer whether... More »
This Dutch Wunderkind Now Has the Funds to Build His Ocean Cleanup Machine Last Updated on 2014-09-25 18:23:33 Dutch wunderkind Boyan Slat turned 20 this year. He also closed on $2 million in crowdfunding to build cleanup contraptions designed to intercept and remove plastic refuse from the ocean. The world’s oceans contain millions of tons of garbage, much of it plastic debris that collects in gyres that span hundreds of miles. Slat, an aeronautical engineer and founder of the Ocean Cleanup, has been contemplating how best to attack this problem since the age of 16.   The solution he came up with, as I wrote in an earlier post, is to deploy several V-shaped floating barriers that will be moored to the seabed and strategically placed in the path of major ocean currents. The 30-mile-long arms of the Vs, he says, will catch buoyant garbage and trash floating 3 meters below the surface while allowing sea life to pass underneath. In June, Slat, together with a team of about 70... More »
Oceanic Coal Pollution, Epic Rate Last Updated on 2014-08-12 11:58:26 Each year, the lion's share of mercury poison comes from burning more than 8.3 billion tons of coal to provide energy for electricity grids. Join Earth Dr Reese Halter from Los Angeles in another segment of SOS as he tells us about our oceans brimming with mercury poisoning. As a result of this insatiable addiction to coal, mercury toxicity has tripled in our oceans to over 80,000 tons of poison. Eighty-four percent of fish tested are laced with methyl-mercury, say scientists from the Biodiversity Research Institute in Maine. In December of 2013 Shanghai's concentration of tiny toxic PM 2.5 particles was 602.5 micrograms per cubic meter, an extremely hazardous level that shattered all previous records for poisonous air pollution. By the way, that compares to the World Heath Organization's acceptable safety standard of air quality of 25 micrograms per cubic meter.... More »
Anatara Kihavah Villas goes to Sea with marine biologist Joseph Lassus Last Updated on 2014-07-06 09:59:09                    Situated in the Maldives’ Baa Atoll island archipelago, Anantara Kihavah Villas is the perfect place from which to enjoy the underwater world of the Indian Ocean. Here, you can snorkel some of the world’s most treasured reefs, explore uninhabited deserted islands, or cruise in solitude into a tapestry of unimaginable colors. Recovering from the 1998 El Nino that destroyed most of the country’s shallow reef coral, in June 2011 UNESCO declared the Baa Atoll a Biosphere Reserve. Operating as an eco-conscious beach resort, Anantara Kihava Villas has been dedicated to supporting the recovery since opening in 2012. This luxury resort counts among Green Globe’s top performing members. In its commitment to protect and preserve the environment, the property has... More »
From Despair to Repair: Dramatic Decline of Caribbean Corals Can Be Reversed Last Updated on 2014-07-02 13:46:18 Gland, Switzerland, 02 July 2014 – With only about one-sixth of the original coral cover left, most Caribbean coral reefs may disappear in the next 20 years, primarily due to the loss of grazers in the region, according to the latest report by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The report, Status and Trends of Caribbean Coral Reefs: 1970-2012, is the most detailed and comprehensive study of its kind published to date – the result of the work of 90 experts over the course of three years. It contains the analysis of more than 35,000 surveys conducted at 90 Caribbean locations since 1970, including studies of corals, seaweeds, grazing sea urchins and fish.   The results show that the Caribbean corals have declined by more than 50% since the... More »